Why Don’t More YouTube Channels Discuss Finance?

Money is an uncomfortable subject. Some of us are taught from a very young age that it’s like religion and politics: you just don’t talk about it. But the sad truth is, regardless of your discomfort with money and finance as a conversation topic, we all use it, so we all need it. Money is what the majority of the world uses in exchange for goods and services. Regardless of courtesy, I think it’s something we need to talk about, especially with regard to our spending habits, as well as social influence.

As you know, I love YouTube. I have my own channel, and I love watching the videos of other people too.

I spent a lot of time the other day wondering why people on YouTube don’t talk about money. And yes, maybe it’s because it’s a bit of a taboo topic. But there are other reasons as well, and many of them have to do with viewership.

Viewers are turned off by sponsored videos. When people share their lives or viewpoints on the Internet, it is the assumption of their viewers that they are getting authenticity on the creator’s part. When paid sponsorships get thrown into the mix, some viewers feel that the authenticity of the channel has been compromised. And when they feel like the channel or creator has become “fake,” they either stop watching or they make rude comments.

Viewers are turned off when a content creator promotes his or her side-projects. For the same reason I stated above, when a YouTuber promotes a side-project or side business, people get mean. And I think that’s really stupid and counter-productive; imagine you had a YouTube channel that had a decently-sized audience, and a side business that you were equally as proud of, if not more–why wouldn’t you promote a business you are proud of on your channel?

Viewers often believe that YouTubers make a lot more money than they actually do. Yes, AdSense gives creators an opportunity to monetize their videos. However, even with a large subscriber count, AdSense pays based on engagement with a video–usually by clicks. YouTubers don’t get rich based on ads alone, and this is a serious misconception on the part of people who don’t make videos. The amount of money someone can make on YouTube varies and is based on a multitude of factors.

Finance probably isn’t the most interesting subject to many viewers (or creators). I think many of us are interested in getting new stuff but not really how much it costs.  Many of us live in hyper-consumptive societies and as hyper-consumers, we like the gratification of getting something now–or if you watch YouTube, seeing someone talk about their new stuff. We’re not all that interested in whether or not a creator is putting money away for retirement or a college fund for their kids. We just want to see and hear about the new stuff (and maybe get some new stuff of our own).

It’s really none of our business. And it’s true: the amount of money my favorite YouTuber makes in a week, a month, a year, from AdSense, from sponsorships–whatever–is not my business. And it’s not your business either.

Is there anything you wish was discussed more on YouTube?
Take a shot every time you see me write the words “new stuff” and share your thoughts in the comments down below!

A Look Back at My First Cooking Challenge on YouTube

If you’re one of my 17 subscribers on YouTube, you might already know that during the month of October, in addition to my weekly video, I wanted to post a new cooking video every week, and every recipe had to feature pumpkin as a key ingredient.

Well, that’s over now and I thought I would share what I learned, both about making videos and cooking, and what I thought went well, what I want to improve on, and what’s next.

Part of my goal with creating this challenge was to create an upload schedule, and to stick to it. About that… I did not do that for my first two videos. The first week I had troubleshooting issues and the following week was the week from hell, schedule-wise. The good news is that I solved the troubleshooting problem with my voiceover, so I won’t run into that issue again… hopefully.

Furthermore, I cannot wait until Daylight Savings Time. It gets dark here so early, so I have to have every light in my kitchen on. And in my living room, there are no lights. Just a single lamp. So. Lighting at this time of year. It’s a concern for me.

What I learned:

  • Cooking videos are a lot of work. It’s one thing to have the camera pointing down towards the pot or bowl or whatever. Then you have to adjust the angle if you change the shot from tabletop to in front of the oven. And so on.

What I learned about cooking:

  • Read the recipe because sometimes you need 29 oz. of pumpkin puree and you don’t have enough because you just assumed 15 was enough
  • There are more than 2 peppers in the can

What I think went well:

  • Not to toot my own horn, but I already feel like I’ve come a long way already since starting my channel in April. With every few videos, I can see the strides I’ve made. THAT SAID, I know I still have a long way to go.
  • During my pumpkin cheesecake video, I found the best camera angle (I think) for the top of my kitchen table. It was so easy to see what I was doing and what I was mixing in the video. I used a similar angle for the videos after that.

What I want to improve on:

  • Inflection. I know I need it in my voiceovers–having a monotone is so inconvenient when you’re doing YouTube!

What’s next?

My next big project is Vlogmas, in which people on YouTube upload a video every day until Christmas. I’ve never done it before, but I want footage of at least 20 days in December and 10 videos.

I definitely want to do more cooking videos in the future, but I’m not sure when I will focus on a particular ingredient again. Expect some cooking and food-related content during Vlogmas, but I don’t have anything specific in mind.